NASA

NASA is releasing their best technologies to the world - giving anyone the chance to create new products.

Since our founding, NASA’s vision has been to reach for new heights and reveal the unknown so that what we do and learn will benefit all humankind. To do that, thousands of people have been working around the world -- and off of it -- for more than 50 years, trying to answer some basic questions that will make life better here on Earth.

Now we’re asking you to join the team. We’ve developed innumerable technologies to support human life in space. But can they also serve us here on Earth?

Starting now, and over the next few months, we’ll be releasing our most exciting technologies onto Marblar, allowing anyone on Earth to suggest new ways they can be used. New products they can create. New ways to benefit mankind. We can’t wait to read your ideas.

Welcome aboard. Let’s get started.

These are NASA technologies currently looking for new product applications.

You can use any of these as a basis for your idea, and even combine multiple technologies.

Want to see which ideas have already been submitted?

Latest 10 technologies
Browse all NASA technologies
Laser sources typically create narrow beams with an uneven intensity profile. We found a cheap method of spreading out the beam while at the same time creating a very even distribution of intensity.
Developed by NASA
A portable and collapsible pressurized chamber that can be used for the treatment/prevention of decompression sickness resulting from rapid changes in pressure
Developed by NASA
A laser distance measurement tool that allows distance-variations across an object up to 20 meters away to be determined with micrometer accuracy.
Developed by NASA
A centralised control unit that not only sends commands to individual air-conditioning and heater units, but also delivers electrical power. This greatly simplifies the installation of temperature control systems for large structures.
Developed by NASA
A lightweight, precise and failure-resistant valve and regulator with few moving parts and rapid response, which opens and closes via magnetic-field induced materials shape changes.
Developed by NASA
A compact, low power and robust gas sensor for leak detection in vacuum. The device detects low gas content through optical measurements.
Developed by NASA
A method for determining the volume of gas and liquid in a tank when there is no clear interface between the materials due to e.g. a reduced-gravity environment.
Developed by NASA
A laser-based gyroscope that can measure rotation over a wide range of speeds. Incorporating a material that changes the propagation speed of the lasers and filters out noise increases the sensitivity at low rotation speeds.
Developed by NASA
Using materials that convert magnetic fields into deformation, we create a device that can quickly and precisely sense and regulate pressure without moving parts or seals.
Developed by NASA
A compact, low power device capable of detecting presence of multiple species of gas simultaneously in vacuum using interferometry.
Developed by NASA